Brief history

Brief History of Patrick and Bridget McIntyre

Patrick McIntyre (c1831-1901) married Bridget Stevens (c1829-1908) on March 3, 1851 in St. Attracta’s Roman Catholic Church, Toulestrane, County Sligo, Ireland. They had eleven known children. The first five were born in Ireland: Edward (1852-1931); Bartholomew (1854-1924); Mary (1856-1934); Dominick (c1860-1932); and Catherine (1861-1914). Patrick, his wife and five children, left Ireland in 1863 sailing on the SS Orient into New York harbor and finally settling in San Francisco, California where the last six children were born: John Dunn (1864-a1908); Elizabeth (1867-1869); William (1869-1879); James (1871-1874); Thomas (c1874-a1931); and Ellen (1879-1963). Patrick and Bridget homesteaded in Oregon in the 1880s. Patrick died in 1901 and Bridget died in 1908. They are both buried in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Portland, Oregon.

Patrick's parents, Edward (c1805/6-1881) and Ann McIntyre (c1803/07-1889), both born in Ireland, also came to the US settling in the San Francisco area. From the records, it appears Edward and Ann came a few years before Patrick.


Friday, January 27, 2017

Mercedes McIntyre Artiga and Ricardo Ayala Artiga Naturalization Papers

Mercedes McIntyre Artiga (1896-1978) although born in San Salvador, was an American citizen due to her father, Bartholomew McIntyre (1854-1924) becoming an American citizen when his father, Patrick (c1831-1901) was naturalized in 1869 in San Francisco, California. Although we have Patrick's naturalization date on several documents, due to the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, it is believed the actual naturalization records have been lost.

Despite Mercedes being an American citizen, the rules at the time of her marriage in 1921 to Ricardo Ayala Artiga (1894-1987) stated that if an American marries an alien, they lose their American citizenship.

So, it became necessary for Mercedes to "apply" to be naturalized since she had "lost" her US citizenship at the time of her marriage. To enlarge the images below, click once on it.



From the document above you can see Mercedes took the oath of allegiance and was sworn in as an American citizen on November 10, 1941.

Her husband, Ricardo (Richard) Ayala Artiga, also petitioned for naturalization in or around 1939. He also was granted American citizenship on June 29, 1942.



Thank you Joanie Zandona for providing these documents.

Saturday, March 5, 2016

Death Notices for Children of Patrick and Bridget

Patrick and Bridget had twelve documented children.  Obituaries have not been located for all the children, but the ones that have been found are listed below.  If you have a copy of a death notice not represented here, please share it with the family.  Thank you.

The children are listed in birth order.

Photo courtesy: Dolly Purcell - Mt. View Cemetery, Portland
Edward (1852-1931)

Edward M'Intyre of Clarkes, Succumbs -- Edward McIntyre, a resident of the Clarkes section the last 40 years, died suddenly near his home Monday morning while picking blackberries.  He was found dead near McIntyre's store about 10 minutes after he had left the house to pick berries.
Mr. McIntyre was born in Iowa (sic), July 27, 1852, and with his parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Patrick McIntyre, came west to California six years later.  Forty years ago he moved to Clarkes.

He leaves four children -- Lillian McIntyre of San Francisco, Mrs. Cora Goridan of The Dalles, and Edward and William McIntyre of Clarkes.

Two brothers and two sisters also survive -- Dominic McIntyre of Clarkes, and Thomas McIntyre of Wyoming, Mrs. Mary Lemane [sic Leonard] of San Francisco, and Mrs. Anne Flaherty of Portland.
The remains are at the mortuary of E. A. Brady. Funeral arrangements are not complete.

Morning Enterprise, Oregon City, Tuesday, September 15, 1931, page 1.


Edward McIntyre Dies at His Clarkes Home -- Edward McIntyre, prominent resident of Clackamas county, making his home on his farm in Clarkes for the past 40 years, died suddenly from heart trouble at the rear of the store of his son, Edward McIntyre, Jr., well know merchant of that place Monday morning about 10 o'clock.  At the time Mr. McIntyre was picking blackberries in a garden of the McIntyre home, and shortly after arriving there was found dead by the son Edward.
Mr. McIntyre was born in Ireland, July 27, 1852, and came to the United States with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Patrick McIntyre, when he was six years of age. He followed farming for many years in the Clarkes country.

Since the death of his wife, Mrs. Sarah McIntyre, in 1888, Mr. McIntyre continued his residence on the old home place he purchased 40 years ago.

Surviving are the sons, Edward Jr., Clarkes; William McIntyre, operating the McIntyre store No. 2 at Upper Highland; his daughters, Miss Lillie McIntyre, San Francisco; Mrs. Cora Gordian, The Dalles, Ore.; two brothers, Dominick McIntyre, Clarkes; Thomas McIntyre, Wyoming; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Lemane [sic Leonard], San Francisco, and Mrs. Dan Flaherty, Portland, besides a grandson, Claude Gordian, The Dalles.

The body is at the Edward Brady mortuary, Oregon City.  Funeral services are to be held when word is received from relatives at a distance.

Banner Courier, Oregon City, Oregon, Monday September 14, 1931, page 1.


McIntyre Rites Today - Funeral services for Edward McIntyre of Clarkes, who died Monday morning near his home, will be held at 10 o'clock this morning at the graveside in Mountain View cemetery.  E.a a. Brady is in charge.  Andrew C. Baker will officiate at the services.

Unknown Newspaper in Cemetery File, September 14, 1931.

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Bartholomew/Bartolo (1854-1924)

Photo courtesy: Joanie Zandona - San Salvador
MOURNING NOTE  -
Don Bartolo Mc Intire

We were already at the time of printing press when we received the sad news of the decease in this capital city of Don Bartolo McIntire, a North American who lived in El Salvador, and who was linked to various honorable households in the country, and who are today in mourning.

The life journey of this foreigner was well accomplished, a man who seemed to have come to show our youth, by eloquent example, how to make use of time in a practical manner, how personal energy stamped with constant work translates into material assets that provide spiritual satisfaction; with what means an unknown man opens roads and makes a way, dominating the environment and earning respect and consideration. That is how, don Bartolo, who first and foremost was a man in a way that the honorable concept of being a man signifies, it can be said that he said farewell to life peacefully, because he knew how to fill every minute of his existence with intense and rewarding labor.
Bartolo's Great-grandchildren, c1967
Iris Margarita & Juan Jose'
Photo courtesy: Juan Jose' Morales Tijerino

He was, here, the organizer of Taller Mercedes (Iron Workshop). In California he had his leg cut; and he, who was an excellent mechanic, built an artificial limb for himself that was so perfect, that the defect was hardly noticed.

He fathered a numerous family, and leaves them with the memory of a clean and respected name.
We send our expressions of condolence to the family of the estimable deceased.
Photo courtesy: Patricia Morales Tijerino, 2014
Grave monument has been painted and gold leafed

Undated San Salvador newspaper article, translated by Patricia Morales Tijerino, August 10, 2013

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Photo courtesy: Dolly Purcel

Dominick (1855-1932)

Death Comes to Four in County During Week -- Dominic D. McIntyre -- Many friends of the late Dominic McIntyre, prominent farmer of Clarkes, attended the funeral services held at the graveside in Mountain View Cemetery Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock.  Andrew Baker, pastor of Christ's church, officiated, with Edward Brady in charge.  By singular coincidence Mr. Brady was the best man for Mr. McIntyre and Miss Mary McDonald at their wedding in 1889.
Pallbearers were R. L. Hildebrand, Henry Hughes, Hosea Dougen, Luke Duffy, R. L. Parrish and R. H. Hildebrand.

Surviving are the wife, Mrs. Mary McIntyre, Clarkes, and three daughters, Mrs. J. H. Quigley, Mrs. J. P. Shanton and Miss Katherine McIntyre, of Portland.

Banner-Courier, Friday July 8, 1932, page 1, Oregon City, OR.


Last Rites Today for D. McIntyre - Last rites for Dominic McIntyre, who died Sunday morning at Clarkes, will be held this morning at 10 o'clock at the graveside in Mountain View cemetery. Andrew Clark Baker of Christ church officiate.  E. A. Brady has charge of the services.

Mr. McIntyre is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary McIntyre, of Clarkes; and three daughters, Mrs. J. E. Quigley, Miss Katherine McIntyre and Mrs. J. P. Stanton, all of Portland.

Morning Enterprise, Wednesday, 6 July 1932, page 6.


Dominic McIntyre, 75, resident of Clarkes the past 50 years, passed away suddenly Monday at his home.  He was a native of Ireland.  surviving are his widow, Mary McIntyre, and three daughters. The body is at the E. A. Brady mortuary.



Morning Enterprise, Oregon City, Tuesday, 5 July 1932, page 1.

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Photo courtesy: Sal Bigone - Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma California
Mary McIntyre Leonard Lane (1856-1934)

LANE - In this city, June 12, 1934, Mary J. Leonard Lane, wife of the late James Leonard, loving mother of Andrew J., James T., William P., Bartholomew, Joseph A., John A. Leonard and the late Andrew J. Leonard; native of Ireland.
Friends are invited to attend the funeral Friday morning, June 15th, at St. Dominic's church, Bush and Steiner sts., where a solemn requiem high mass will be offered for the repose of her soul, commencing at 9 o'clock. Interment, Holy Cross.

Source: San Francisco Examiner, June 13, 1934, page 15.








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Image from Find-A-Grave - Location Odd Fellows
Cemetery, The Dalles, Oregon
Catherine McIntyre Kreft (1861-1914)

An Obituary (Contributed)
Mrs. Kate Kreft (nee McIntyre) was born in county Sligo, Ireland on March 17, 1862.  While she was still a baby her parents emigrated to America, arriving in San Francisco early in 1864. In 1877 Miss McIntyre was married in San Francisco to Paul L. Kreft. Of eight children, the issue of this union, four survive their mother.  They are Mrs. Henrietta Burchtorf and Mrs. William Wells of this city, Mrs. James Keane of Portland and Paul L. Kreft of Pendleton.

Mr & Mrs. Kreft came to Oregon in the year 1879, residing for a short time on a ranch, the property of the McIntyre family. In 1880 they came to The Dalles where Mr. Kreft engaged in business until a serious illness forced him to retire.  He lingered on in an invalid condition for over a year, and passed away on July 23, 1900.

Of Mrs. Kreft's faithfulness and loyalty as a wife and mother; her devotion to Mr. Kreft during his last illness when for many months she never left his bedside; of the energy and industry she displayed in providing and caring for her family, it is needless to write, as all the persons concerned are well acquainted with the facts.

It is chiefly an account of her indomitable courage, patience and cheerfulness in the face of veritable mountains of sorrows and misfortune that her memory will be cherished by her numerous friends and acquaintances. This is not the place in which to recount the many vicissitudes through which Mrs. Kreft and her family passed. Suffice it to say that seldom does it fall to the lot of one mother or one family to be visited as they were. But, through all, Mrs. Kreft maintained a brave and cheery disposition, with which was combined Christian charity, and a generosity that was almost a fault - every ready to nurse the sick, aid the needy, console the unfortunate.

Surely, if charity be the greatest virtue, this sweet and noble soul has earned and received the welcome greeting of its maker - "Well done, thou good and faithful servant; enter into the joy of thy Lord."
(d. May 1, 1914)

Source: The Dalles Daily Chronicle, May 4, 1914; Dolly Purcell, via email, May 4, 2014

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Sarah (c1863-1873)
No death notice has been located, but she was buried in Calvary Cemetery, Colma, California on March 2, 1873.

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John Dunn (1864-after 1908)
Date and place of death not known.

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Elizabeth (1867-1869)

In this city, Sept. 30, Elizabeth M., infant daughter of Patrick and Bridget McIntire, aged 2 years, 1 month and 7 days.

Source: The San Francisco Examiner, October 4, 1869, page 3

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William (1869-1879)

MCINTYRE - In this city, December 13th, William, son of Patrick and Bridget McIntyre, aged 10 years, 9 months and 18 days.

Source: The San Francisco Examiner, December 15, 1879, page 3

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James (1871-1874)

In this city, December 25th, James, son of Patrick and Bridget McIntyre, aged 3 years, 7 months and 25 days.

Source: The San Francisco Examiner, December 26, 1874, page 3

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Thomas (c1874-after 1931)
Date and place of death unknown

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Photo courtesy: Joanie Zandona - Location: Mt. Calvary, Portland Oregon


Ellen "Nell" (1879-1963)
Death notice not yet located.










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Note: Many of these death notices have been provided by family members.
Updated: January 24, 2017; March 5, 2016; August 21, 2014; original post May, 2014.

Friday, March 4, 2016

Mercedes Iron Works - El Salvador

Book Cover
Bartolo McIntire (Bartholomew McIntyre 1854-1924) was selected by Mr. Carlos Melendez, the President of El Salvador, to run The Mercedes Iron Works (Fundición Mercedes). This iron foundry and machine works was named in honor of President Melendez's mother. The following text from "Libro Azul" de El Salvador ("Blue Book" of Salvador) notes that "The Mercedes Iron Works will live in the memories of all as the wedge that opened the way for the march of progress."

Thank you Patricia Morales Tijerino for locating and sharing this bit of family history.

If you click on each image, it will enlarge.








Again, thank you Patricia for sharing this source with us.

Source: "Blue Book" of Salvador, Compiler and Editor: L. A. Ward; Latin American Publicity, Bureau, 1916, pages 11-14.


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In "Eran Mares los Cañales" (the sugar cane fields were like a sea) - History of Sugar in El Salvador,  Patricia Morales Tijerino found a passage which also talks about Bartolo McIntire and his participation in the development of El Salvador's economy. Sections from the book are shown below followed by Patricia's translation of the excerpt. Thank you Patricia for sharing this. (Book cover shown to the right.)





Starting from "La Fundición Mercedes: "The direction of the Fundición Mercedes (iron foundry) was commissioned to the US national Bartolo McEntire, it was born with the priority of meeting the mechanical needs of the family-owned sugar cane mills, without disregarding the provision of steel and metallic services and of general mechanics to other persons or insitutions not only from the country, but from the entire Central American region. Equipped with huge furnaces to smelt metals, lathes and metal mechanic benches, the company had a series of mishaps in its first decades, including a major fire that forced its entire reconstruction in December 1911, a remodellation that included purchasing new equipment and building an adjoining area destined for social affairs."


Source: Eran Mares Los Cañales, Publisher: Asociación Azucarera de El Salvador (Sugar Industry Association of El Salvador), 2009. Researcher: Cañas Dinarte, Carlos Manuel, 1971, pages 116-117.



Thursday, March 3, 2016

Elena McIntire and Erasmo Morales

Elena McIntire [1886-1974] (daughter of Bartolo McIntire, 1854-1924 and Concepción Ramos, ? - 1913) married Erasmo Morales, [? - 1968]. They had four children:

  • Elva Elena Morales, 1911-2001
  • Armando Erasmo Morales, 1912-1973
  • Conchita Angélica Morales, c1918-1921
  • Rey Roberto Morales, 1923-2012

Marriage January 14, 1911, San Salvador

Excerpt from "El Libro Azul de El Salvador, 1916" p. 352

Patricia Morales Tijerino's "aha" moment: 

"What I have gathered with the information in the Blue Book is that the Fundición Mercedes and the coffee mill that my grandfather Erasmo Morales owned (also according to the Blue Book) were in the same neighborhood. My sister and I figured that probably that's how Erasmo met Elena McIntire.

"Who knows, maybe he went to the Fundición to commission some iron parts for his mill....and laid eyes on Elena....They were married in January 1911 before that major fire [at the Fundición Mercedes] mentioned in the book."


Elena and Erasmo Morales with son, Roberto, c1930


Elena McIntire de Morales with grandson, Juan José, c1965


Elena McIntire de Morales celebrating 85th Birthday, August 13, 1971


Memorial card, 1974


Photos and images courtesy:
Sal Bigone: Wedding photo;
Patricia Morales Tijerino: Blue Book of El Salvador clip; photo of Elena and Erasmo with Roberto, and 85th birthday
Juan José Morales Tijerino: Photo with grandson;
Marina McIntyre de Steffan: Memorial card.

Bartolo McIntire Death Notices, c1924

Bartolo McIntire (Bartholomew McIntyre 1854-1924) death notices from various (unknown/undated) El Salvadorian newspapers were located by Patricia Morales Tijerino. She found these clippings in her Mom's folder and scanned them. Thank you, thank you.


Click once on image to enlarge

Patricia kindly translated the notice at the bottom, center column, entitled: Luto


"Don Bartolo Mc.Intire

Mr. Bartolo McIntire has deceased today in this capital, a gentleman highly esteemed in social circles. A United States original, he came to this country many years ago and established here definitely. He contributed greatly to the development of mechanics, and the Fundición Mercedes workshops were established under his management. Many elegant buildings of this city were built by him. It is worth mentioning the legacy of former president Carlos Meléndez, where the Mexico Legacy is located now. We deeply deplore the loss of the McIntire gentleman and send his grieving family the expressions of our condolences."

Source: Patricia Morales Tijerino, via email, February 20, 2016

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The newspaper clip just above the "Luto" notice reads:

"Burial
This morning the body of Mr. Bartolo McIntire was buried. At El Cementerio General mortuary, many people formed a funeral procession. A large collection of flower offerings covered the tomb of the deceased."

Translation via Google Translate and Elaine Beaudoin

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Clip on the right side of the page above:

MOURNING NOTE  -
Don Bartolo Mc Intire

We were already at the time of printing press when we received the sad news of the decease in this capital city of Don Bartolo McIntire, a North American who lived in El Salvador, and who was linked to various honorable households in the country, and who are today in mourning.

The life journey of this foreigner was well accomplished, a man who seemed to have come to show our youth, by eloquent example, how to make use of time in a practical manner, how personal energy stamped with constant work translates into material assets that provide spiritual satisfaction; with what means an unknown man opens roads and makes a way, dominating the environment and earning respect and consideration. That is how, don Bartolo, who first and foremost was a man in a way that the honorable concept of being a man signifies, it can be said that he said farewell to life peacefully, because he knew how to fill every minute of his existence with intense and rewarding labor.

He was, here, the organizer of Taller Mercedes (Iron Workshop). In California he had his leg cut; and he, who was an excellent mechanic, built an artificial limb for himself that was so perfect, that the defect was hardly noticed.

He fathered a numerous family, and leaves them with the memory of a clean and respected name.
We send our expressions of condolence to the family of the estimable deceased.

Translated by Patricia Morales Tijerino

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For photos of Bartolo elsewhere in this blog, click here.

The remainder of the death notices will be translated as time permits.

Concepción R. de McIntire and Conchita Angélica Morales-McIntire Death Notices

In addition to the death notices of Bartolo McIntire (Bartholomew McIntyre 1854-1924), Patricia Morales Tijerino also located in her Mom's files, death notices for Bartolo's wife, Concepción Ramos de McIntire (? - 1913), and his niece, Conchita Angélica Morales-McIntire (c1919-1921), the daughter of Erasmo Morales (? - 1968)  and Elena McIntire de Morales (1886-1974).

Click on image to enlarge

As time permits, the death notices will be translated. Thank you Patricia for sharing these great documents with the family.

Click here for a photo of Concepción Ramos de McIntire.

Source: Patricia Morales Tijerino, email to Elaine Beaudoin, February 20, 2016

Friday, January 22, 2016

Elizabeth Jane Artiga (1923-2013) Survives 1927 Hurricane in Mazatlan, Mexico

Elizabeth (Betty) Jane Artiga was born to Mercedes McIntyre and Ricardo Artiga on February 16, 1923, at Mount Zion Hospital in San Francisco, California.  For unknown reasons, within her first year, Betty was sent to live in San Salvador with relatives.  Her Aunt Francisca (McIntyre) took care of her.  

Then in August 1927, when Betty was almost five years old, Mercedes, along with a servant, traveled down to San Salvador to bring Betty back to the United States.  This gap in years always puzzled Betty and, though she seeked for a reason as to why she had been sent to San Salvador away from her parents, she was never able to get an answer from her mother.  

On the return trip, Betty remembered anchoring in Mazatlan but from a little child's perspective, she did not understand what was happening or the gravity of the situation.  What she relayed to her daughter, Joan, was that Mercedes had gone ashore and had left her alone with a nurse for a long time.  It was dark and cold and Betty remembered being afraid. 

As it turns out, the ship manifest reveals that Betty's nurse was none other than Martha Herrera, the faithful member (servant) of the family whose name has shown as living with the McIntyres as early as the 1920 census.  According to Betty, Martha stayed by her side in the darkness unbeknownest to her that there was a hurricane raging all around her.  Once the storm had passed, Mercedes was able to come back to the ship and continue on to the Port of San Francisco thanks to the heroic efforts of the ship's captain.  

Joan Hamiton Zandona




This photo, provided by Joan Zandona, shows Betty Artiga at 4 years old. The doll and baby carriage are the same as shown in the newspaper clipping below. It is thought that both photos were taken the same day in 1927.

The newspaper article appeared on the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle, September 20. It tells of the hurricane that hit Mazatlan, Mexico, where she and her family were on September 10, 1927.


Click on the article to enlarge


More about the 1927 hurricane:

September 10th 1927 A Historic Hurricane Hits Mazatlan Written by Lloyd Goldstein.


"On September 6th 1927, to the South of the Gulf of Tehuantepec, a hydro meteorological phenomenon was forming. At high speed, the hurricane was intensifying along the coast, causing havoc for the entire coastline of the Pacific. On September 8th it was off the coast of Manzanillo, and on September 10th entered the Sea of Cortez and hit Mazatlan. It was the second worst hurricane of the season, with the only difference that the worst hurricane did not come on land, but was lost in the immensity of the ocean. The hurricane was devastating for both Mazatlan and much of the country.

"Uniquely, it was not the deadliest. Mazatlan survives with only 1 dead, commendable for the time: a child walked down the boardwalk in high waves when a wave took him. In total, the season left 184 dead across the Pacific, according to reports, while the 1926 season killed a 1,370, and in 1928, 3,411. In just 90 years, Mazatlan had gone from 3 to 30,000 inhabitants. Far was the memory of the 1902-03 plague, which had infected one of every 20 mazatlecos. Far was the memory of the revolution, even though it had been relatively noble in the port, compared with other parts of the country, leaving its batch of death and desolation. 

"Measuring the speed of the winds of a hurricane was not easy in those years. Normally ships gave wind reports, and for that the boat had to survive the shipwreck. On the other hand, hurricanes cause changes in atmospheric pressure, and is from the pressure that the power has been calculated: the smaller atmospheric pressure the greater the strength of the hurricane. The hurricane of 1927 registered a pressure of 987 millibars. For reference, the average atmospheric pressure at sea in the United States is 1313.25, and the lower register of a hurricane in history occurred recently, in 2005, when Hurricane Vilma ranged from the 982 to 882 millibars. 

"The waves from the hurricane of 1927 were memorable. Seven and a half meters tall, they were enough for flooding and rendered the railway lines inoperable. Pathways to Mazatlan had only less than 20 years of being built. With trains not running and damaged roads, the city was disconnected by land with the rest of the country. 

"Rainfall affected practically the entire country. The city of Acámbaro, Guanajuato, was reported to be flooded, and many displaced in Sonora crossed the border to take refuge in Nogales. The city most affected by the hurricane was Salina Cruz, Oaxaca. In it, even though there was a timely evacuation by the sudden change in air pressure, most of the deaths occurred, and the village of 5,000 inhabitants was practically in ruins. Salina Cruz had been affected by the opening of the Panama Canal, and had begun a demographic decrease that continued until 1947. Steam Bolívar, who had left Oaxaca on August 22nd, the road to San Pedro, California, never finished the tour. The British Cape of Good Hope ship and the charger Grace Dollar were also lost. 

"In Mazatlan, there was considerable damage to the fishing fleet, which in those years specializing in fishing for sharks – it would take more than 10 years that the shrimp culture was born in the Sea of Cortez."

Sources: 
San Francisco Chronicle, September 20, 1927, pages 1 and 3; accessed Genealogybank.com, January 17, 2016.
History of flood: MazatlanMyCity.com, http://www.mazatlanmycity.com/es/our-mazatlan-vintage-photographs.html accessed January 19, 2016.